ARchitectural Services faqs

Why do we charge so much less than other architect?

Architects usually work from large offices and employ more staff receptionists advisers and so on, they often design high risk blocks or amazing glass towers or stunning cutting-edge bridges also most architectural practices still consider the domestic market as was years ago a lucrative side-line charging homeowners ridiculous prices.

We specialize in domestic house plans and can therefore draw on a wealth of knowledge gained from having prepared similar projects locally many times before. We also use the latest equipment to produce floor plans and elevations quickly indeed we are often asked to produce existing floor plans and elevations for architect and there practices because we can do it more cost effectively than they can.

What is Planning permission?

Planning Permission is the formal approval you must obtain from your local council when building work is to be commenced that will result in

“a change of use of a building or it’s land, a change in it’s appearance, changes in the highway access or changes to the local environment”

In basic terms, your local planning department are not concerned with how structurally sound your extension is or how thick your insulation is going to be. They are there to decide what sort of impact your new building is going to have on it’s surroundings. This may include aesthetics (i.e. What style windows you are planning to use, what colour bricks you will use, what roof shape you have chosen or how the building adjoins to your existing home). This may also include access issues (i.e. Whether you will need a new driveway and how this would affect the existing highway). The planners will also want to know if any trees are likely to be affected by your new proposal and this could impact their decision to let you proceed with the work. These are just a few examples to give you a feel of what is going through your local planner’s head as he or she looks through your drawings and application forms.

Not all new buildings or extensions need planning permission. There are now certain types and sizes of developments and extensions that come under the what is called Permitted Development rights. To find out if you need planning permission, just call your local council or give Edward Jones Architecture Services a call.

To get Planning Permission for a new extension or addition to your home, your local authority will want architectural drawings, completed application form and marked OS maps show the location of the new development. Parking provision statements, and on some occasions additional statements are required such as design and access statement, tree survey or statement, and heritage statements.

Edward Jones Architecture Services are experienced Architectural Designers and Technicians and can produce all the relevant plans on your behalf, complete all the relevant forms documentation and statements and arrange any addition survey required. We also liaise with your local planning authority to ensure your application has the best chance of being approved.

What are Permitted development rights?

Not all projects require planning permission, if you have never had extensions on your property before, you don’t live in a listed building or in a conservation area and your extension or loft conversion is within a certain criteria you may qualify for a Lawful Development Certificate, which means you will not need planning but probably will require building regulation approval.

How long does planning and building regulation approval take to be processed?

The process can vary from council to council. A decision on planning approval is normally a standard 8 weeks Building regulation approval normally takes approximately 4-6 weeks but again can occasionally run over.

What are the Building Regulations?

When a Home Extension, loft conversion is designed it needs to comply with Building Regulations, which are a set of minimum standards for design and health and safety in Building works. These standards are enforced by your councils building control department These standards are for; Structure, Drainage, Plumbing, Ventilation, Materials, Insulation, means of escape for fire, etc.

Making a Building Regulation application.

In domestic projects you have one of two routes to make a building Regulation application:

  • 1) Full Plans application which involves submitting detailed drawings and structural calculations which is approved before your start works.
  • 2) Building Notice application which involves submitting a building notices when work starts on the site a building control officer will checks and approve work at regular intervals.
What is the Party Wall Act?.

If you are thinking of altering or extending your home? This Act may apply to you. The Party Act came into force on 1 July 1996 and applies throughout England and Wales. It provides a framework for preventing and resolving disputes in relation to Party Walls, Boundary Walls and Excavations near Buildings. Anyone intending to carry out work of the kinds described in the Act must give Adjoining Owners notice of their intentions.

When are your fees due?

50% of the fee is paid on the survey date or before we start drawing your plans, when the plans are approved by you and you are happy for them to be submitted to the council you the pay us the remaining 50% of the fee. The building regulation drawings are produced as soon as we know you application has been approved, or when you instruct us to do so, the fees are due before drawing commences.

What is the Difference Between Planning & Building Regulations?

There is much confusion among homeowners as to what Planning Permission actually is and what the difference is between Planning and Building Regulations Approval.

We thought it would be helpful to explain the difference between these two very important pieces of legislation.

Planning Permission is the formal approval you must obtain from your local council before building work is to be commenced that will result in a change of use of a building or it’s land, a change in it’s appearance, changes in the highway access or changes to the local environment In basic terms, your local planning department are not concerned with how structurally sound your extension is, or how thick your insulation is going to be They are there to decide what sort of impact your new building is going to have on it’s surroundings. This may include aesthetics (ie. What style windows you are planning to use, what colour bricks you will use, what roof shape you have chosen or how the building adjoins to your existing home). This may also include access issues (ie. Whether you will need a new driveway and how this would affect the existing highway). The planners will also want to know if any trees are likely to be affected by your new proposal and this could impact their decision to let you proceed with the work. These are just a few examples to give you a feel of what is going through your local planner’s head as he or she flicks through your drawings and application forms.

Not all new buildings need planning permission. There are now certain types and sizes of buildings that come under the ‘Permitted Development’ regulations. To find out if you need planning permission, just call your local council or visit the Planning Portal website for more information.

To get Planning Permission for a new extension or addition to your home. Your local authority will need an array of Architectural drawings, a pack of completed forms and a marked OS map to show the location of the new development. Edward Jones Architecture Services can produce all the relevant plans and documents on your behalf, complete all the relevant forms and liaise with your local planning authority to ensure your application has the best chance of being approved. If you think you may need Planning Approval, give us a call on 01283 529148.

Building Regulations

Building regulations are a set of documents that apply to England & Wales and set standards for the design and construction of buildings to ensure the health and safety of people in and around them. In short… this is where the government want to see that your extension is not going to harm you, your family and possibly even innocent bystanders.

As issues are recognised as crucially important to the construction industry they will occasionally be added to the Building Regulations to ensure that all new buildings in England & Wales are built with this in mind.

For example, disabled access and energy performance provisions are now required to be addressed before your building can be signed off as ‘Building Regulation Compliant’.

The Building Regulations outline specific areas that your building work should comply with, these include:

Part A – Structure
Part B – Fire safety
Part C – Site preparation and resistance to moisture
Part D – Toxic substances
Part E – Resistance to the passage of sound
Part F – Ventilation
Part G – Sanitation, hot water safety and water efficiency
Part H – Drainage and waste disposal
Part J – Combustion appliances and fuel storage systems
Part K – Protection from falling, collision and impact
Part L – Conservation of fuel and power
Part M – Access to and use of buildings
Part N – Glazing – safety in relation to impact, opening and cleaning
Part P – Electrical safety

To help us understand how to meet these requirements, the government publish a set of documents called the Approved Documents.

The information contained in these show how to construct a compliant building but they do not not necessarily have to be followed. Each specific Building Control department will decide whether your specific project is deemed to be complaint with each section.

Building Regulations Approval: must be sought after Planning Permission has been granted (if required) and can be applied for in two ways…
The applicant. Can issue a ‘Building Notice: which lets the council know that the building work has begun. The council then liaise with the client and visit the site at regular intervals to ensure the work is being carried out in accordance with the Regulations. This method is can be risky unless you or your builder is are fully aware of the Building Regulation requirements as you could be told to rebuild, re-arrange or remove parts of the building, resulting in lost time and increased costs it is really only meant for small alterations or small extensions.

Full Plans Submission: This involves submitting detailed drawings of the proposed works and material specification, detailing in full how each part of the building complies with the Regulations. The local authority will then, most likely, approve the application based on the drawings or normally approve the application with conditions that must be met. Everyone then knows exactly what is involved and required to build your new extension.

Edward Jones Architecture Services Building Regulation Plans: We are able to produce all the relevant drawings, and liaise with your local Building Control department to ensure your new extension complies, therefore ensuring that building work can commence as soon as possible. If you think you may need Building Regulation approval, please give us a call.

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